• ITVI.USA
    15,100.200
    -20.280
    -0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.892
    0.002
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.120
    0.060
    0.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,071.550
    -20.840
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.960
    0.380
    14.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.710
    0.160
    4.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.290
    -0.010
    -0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.720
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.240
    0.100
    4.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.160
    0.060
    1.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    -5.000
    -3.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,100.200
    -20.280
    -0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.892
    0.002
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.120
    0.060
    0.3%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,071.550
    -20.840
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.960
    0.380
    14.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.710
    0.160
    4.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.290
    -0.010
    -0.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.720
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.240
    0.100
    4.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.160
    0.060
    1.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    -5.000
    -3.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Worthy weather movies for truckers: Part 7

Mostly recent, lesser-known films made the list

Truck drivers work long hours and spend a lot of time alone. Watching movies can be an entertaining and relaxing way for them to kick back on the road after 11-hour shifts or on days off. These lesser-known weather-themed movies are so bad they’re good, with one blockbuster thrown in for good measure.

“Storm in the Heartland” (TV movie) (2009) (Original title: “Tornado Valley”)

Liz McAdams (Meredith Monroe) is haunted by the memories of a tornado that destroyed her home 25 years ago. Now a professional storm tracker, she and her family are in danger again as another devastating twister threatens to rip apart their lives. Caught in the path of destruction, Liz and her estranged husband try to overcome their differences as they struggle to save their loved ones.


RELATED: Truck drivers’ favorite weather movies of all time


“Storm in the Heartland” was directed by Andrew C. Erin, who co-wrote the film with Aaron Kim Johnston. It received an audience rating of 32% on Rotten Tomatoes, and a rating of only 4.4 out of 10 stars on the Internet Movie Database (IMDB), where a reviewer called the movie “another ‘Twister’ clone, only without the budget, and without the F/X.”

“100 Degrees Below Zero” (2013)

When a chain of volcanic eruptions rips through Europe, the enormous ash cloud blocks out the sun, plunging the continent into a new ice age. An American couple must find their kids and get them out of Paris before it freezes over.


RELATED: Truck drivers’ favorite weather movies: Part 2


“100 Degrees Below Zero” was directed by R.D. Braunstein, and written by H. Perry Horton and Richard Schenkman. It received an audience rating of 32% on Rotten Tomatoes, where an audience reviewer called it a “dull contrived suspenseless disaster movie.” It received a rating of only 2.4 out of 10 stars on IMDB, where a user review said “bad acting, bad effects, bad script, bad all the way around. But I loved it. I couldn’t stop laughing”

“Noah” (2014)

More than a decade after the Academy award-winning “A Beautiful Mind”, Russell Crowe and Jennifer Connelly team up to tell the biblical tale of Noah, from the Book of Genesis. Crowe plays the title character who is chosen by God to undertake a momentous mission before an apocalyptic flood cleanses the world. The film was released in North American theaters in 2D and IMAX, while a version converted to 3D and IMAX 3D was released in several other countries.


RELATED: Worthy weather movies for truckers: Part 3


The film was directed by Darren Aronofsky, who co-wrote the screenplay with Ari Handel. “Noah” received generally positive reviews from critics. It grossed more than $362 million worldwide, making it Aronofsky’s highest-grossing film to date. It was praised for its direction and acting. However, it generated controversy, primarily for its lack of racial diversity, perceived environmentalist political messages and extensive use of nonbiblical sources for inspiration.

“Geostorm” (2017)

This film’s main plot centers on a network of satellites designed to control the global climate. When the network begins attacking Earth, it’s a race against the clock for its creator to uncover the real threat before a worldwide geostorm wipes out everything and everyone.

“Geostorm” was co-written and co-produced by Dean Devlin. Principal photography began in October 2014 in New Orleans. After poor test screenings, the film was reshot under executive producer Jerry Bruckheimer, writer Laeta Kalogridis and new director Danny Cannon. The film stars familiar names such as Gerard Butler, Ed Harris and Andy García.


RELATED: Worthy weather movies for truckers: Part 4


Despite grossing $221 million worldwide, the film was labeled a box office flop due to its $120 million budget, losing the studio $74 million. The movie received largely negative reviews, with criticism focused on the “uninspiring” story and “lackluster” visual effects. “Geostorm” received an audience score of only 35% on Rotten Tomatoes, with one critic calling it “a disaster movie so cheesy it should come with pepperoni on top.” and another saying, “I’d be lying if I didn’t admit to giggling madly through the majority of this bit of B-grade hokum.”

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Other related articles:

Worthy weather movies for truckers: Part 5
Worthy weather movies for truckers: Part 6

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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