• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

Carriers propose strategy to reduce GHG in ocean shipping

Three large ocean carrier associations filed a proposal with the International Maritime Organization to consider as it develops a comprehensive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Strategy for maritime shipping.

   The World Shipping Council, BIMCO and the International Parcel Tankers Association filed a proposal with the International Maritime Organization (IMO) on Wednesday to consider as it develops a comprehensive Greenhouse Gas (GHG) Strategy for maritime shipping.
   The proposal specifically calls for:
     • A set of “ambitious objectives” to be included in the IMO’s GHG Strategy, such as facilitating emission reductions in the maritime sector, and encouraging the development of cost-effective, carbon-reducing technologies for the commercial shipping industry;
     • Establishing a maritime research and development program to develop new carbon-reducing technologies both short term and long term;
     • And creating a program to encourage investment in energy efficiency improvements across the world fleet.
   “Shipping companies understand and support the need to reduce their carbon footprint. However, shipping operations today are overwhelmingly dependent on the use of fossil fuels,” John Butler, president and chief executive officer of the Washington-based World Shipping Council, said in a statement.
   “To reduce carbon emissions for the long haul, new technologies will have to be developed, and the IMO can be a global leader in that effort by including an ambitious research and development program as a central part of its Comprehensive GHG Strategy,” he added.
   The IMO agreed to develop a comprehensive GHG strategy at its meeting in October 2016 (MEPC 70). The organization will consider the carrier industry’s proposal along with a number of others and make recommendations at it its next meeting in early July (MEPC 71).
   WSC said it “looks forward to working with the industry and member states as the IMO seeks agreement on an initial GHG Strategy in 2018.”

Chris Gillis

Located in the Washington, D.C. area, Chris Gillis primarily reports on regulatory and legislative topics that impact cross-border trade. He joined American Shipper in 1994, shortly after graduating from Mount St. Mary’s College in Emmitsburg, Md., with a degree in international business and economics.
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