• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
BusinessCanadaCompany earningsInternationalNewsTrucking

Titanium holds steady in Q2 despite revenue drop

Strong performance helps offset pandemic drag

Titanium Transportation Group (TSX-V:TTR) grew profits and paid down debt despite a nearly 10% drop in revenue as the Canadian cross-border trucking and logistics firm pushed through COVID-19 headwinds in the second quarter. 

Ontario-based Titanium reported profits of CA$900,000 (US$676,000) or 2 cents per share, on CA$38 million in revenue. A year ago, the company had net income of CA$500,000) on CA$42 million in revenue.

Operating income increased by 26.1% during the quarter as its Canadian-based trucking and logistics businesses contended with lower revenue. Only Titanium’s U.S. brokerage business had an increase in revenue. 

Titanium CEO Ted Daniel said he was pleased with the results considering the impacts of COVID-19. He highlighted the aggressive repayment of debt during the quarter.

“Our operating discipline and cost-saving initiatives allowed us to fully absorb the additional operating costs related to COVID-19 while once again [being[ able to generate positive free cash flow and reduce our indebtedness during the quarter,” Daniel said in a statement. 

The company used most of its free cash flow, CA$10.9 million, to aggressively pay down debt. 

The improvements to Titanium’s balance sheet put the carrier in an even stronger position as the company sees larger mergers and acquisitions targets in the U.S. and Canada.

Click for more FreightWaves articles by Nate Tabak.

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Nate Tabak, Border and North America Correspondent

Nate Tabak is a Toronto-based journalist who covers cross-border trucking, logistics and trade for FreightWaves. Before moving to Canada, he spent seven years reporting stories in the Balkans and Eastern Europe as a reporter, producer and editor based in Kosovo. He previously worked at newspapers in the San Francisco Bay Area, including the San Jose Mercury News. He graduated from UC Berkeley, where he studied the history of American policing. Contact Nate at ntabak@freightwaves.com.

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