• ITVI.USA
    15,839.740
    -5.440
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.799
    -0.007
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.070
    0.480
    2.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,836.590
    -10.170
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,839.740
    -5.440
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.799
    -0.007
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.070
    0.480
    2.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,836.590
    -10.170
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
American ShipperShippingTrade and Compliance

CMA CGM to use LNG for 22,000-TEU mega-ships

The French ocean carrier reveled its nine future 22,000-TEU containerships, all of which are slated for delivery in 2020, will be equipped with engines that will run primarily on liquefied natural gas (LNG).

   CMA CGM will equip its nine future 22,000-TEU ships with engines that will run primarily on liquefied natural gas (LNG), the French ocean carrier revealed Tuesday.
   All nine ships are scheduled for delivery in 2020.
   CMA CGM said the move makes it the first shipping company in the world to equip giant containerships with this type of motorization.
   Although these ships will be powered with LNG, a small amount of marine gas oil will be used for the ignition in the combustion chamber.
   The use of LNG will use up to 25 percent less CO2, produce 99 percent less sulfur emissions, 99 percent less fine particles, and 85 percent less nitrogen oxides emissions, according to CMA CGM.
   The news comes in the run up to the International Maritime Organization’s (IMO) Maritime Environmental Protection Committee (MPEC) lowering the global cap on the amount of sulfur in marine fuel from 3.5 percent to 0.5 percent on Jan. 1, 2020.
   Just last month, Hyundai Merchant Marine (HMM) President and CEO C.K. Yoo highlighted challenges the sulfur cap will place on the shipping industry, while ExxonMobil released survey results illustrating how the route to compliance with the sulfur cap is still unclear for many vessel operators.

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