• ITVI.USA
    15,615.260
    270.480
    1.8%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.852
    -0.002
    -0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.840
    0.040
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,608.360
    280.700
    1.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.890
    0.070
    2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.540
    -0.040
    -1.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.290
    0.030
    2.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.660
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.360
    0.030
    1.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.100
    0.080
    2%
  • WAIT.USA
    129.000
    2.000
    1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,615.260
    270.480
    1.8%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.852
    -0.002
    -0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    19.840
    0.040
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,608.360
    280.700
    1.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.890
    0.070
    2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.540
    -0.040
    -1.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.290
    0.030
    2.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.660
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.360
    0.030
    1.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.100
    0.080
    2%
  • WAIT.USA
    129.000
    2.000
    1.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Deadly Tennessee flooding closes roads, forces evacuations

8 deaths, 4 of them in Nashville

Updated Mar. 30, 2021 at 7:30 a.m ET

Deadly flooding in the South over the weekend also closed roads, forced evacuations and led to many water rescues.

The Tennessee Highway Patrol (THP) reported 61-year-old Donna Adams of Surgoinsville, Tennessee, was found dead Sunday afternoon. Her Nissan Sentra was swept off a road and into the flooded Big Creek in Hawkins County, according to Trooper David Pierce.

A man apparently drowned in his truck after he drove around barricades in Cheatham County on Sunday night, according to Edwin Hogan, the county fire chief and emergency management director. Cheatham County is west of Nashville.

The Metro Nashville Police Department said four people died in flooding in that city. They included a 70-year-old man whom police found dead in his submerged car, and a second presumed flooding victim who was found on the Nashboro Village golf course.

Two additional flooding victims — a man, 64, and a woman, 46 —  were found dead close to a homeless camp near Wentworth-Caldwell Park. As of Monday morning, police had not identified them.

More than 130 people had to be rescued from the flooding in Nashville, and Mayor John Cooper declared a local state of emergency Sunday.

Nashville International Airport (ICAO code: BNA) received a daily record 5.75 inches of rainfall Saturday. Based on observations, it rained almost nonstop from 6 a.m. that day until 5 a.m. the next. This caused waterways to rise quickly, leading to flash flooding and impassable roads.

Outside Nashville, flooding hit Mount Juliet, Lebanon, Brentwood and parts of Franklin. The Williamson County Emergency Management Agency said crews responded to 34 water rescue calls.

More than 20 people were evacuated from their homes across Campbell County, and in Kingsport, Tennessee, the Fire Department’s swift water rescue team evacuated four families from flooded apartments.


Related: Understanding flooding risks protects truckers’ lives, cargo


Flooding washed away half of the 110-year-old Burnt Mill Bridge near Allardt, Tennessee, in Scott County.

Many roads were closed across the region, including some sections of interstates. Even though most waterways across the region were beginning to recede Monday, they remain above flood stage, and some roads may still be closed. More rain is likely coming by Tuesday afternoon or evening, which could trigger flooding again.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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