• ITVI.USA
    12,507.590
    -2.980
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.856
    -0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.460
    -0.060
    -0.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,563.800
    7.670
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.780
    -0.050
    -1.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.390
    -0.270
    -10.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.800
    -0.040
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.160
    -0.030
    -1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.990
    -0.020
    -1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.880
    -0.060
    -2%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    6.000
    5%
  • ITVI.USA
    12,507.590
    -2.980
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.856
    -0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.460
    -0.060
    -0.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,563.800
    7.670
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.780
    -0.050
    -1.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.390
    -0.270
    -10.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.800
    -0.040
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.160
    -0.030
    -1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.990
    -0.020
    -1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.880
    -0.060
    -2%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    6.000
    5%
Air CargoAmerican ShipperNewsTop Stories

FAA yanks proposed safety conditions for FedEx missile defense system

Agency says more work needed to prevent accidents

The Federal Aviation Administration on Tuesday withdrew special safety conditions it officially proposed earlier in the day that FedEx Express would need to meet in order to receive approval for installing a laser-emitting antimissile defense system on an aircraft.

The decision effectively puts on hold any review of FedEx’s plan for an onboard missile countermeasure. FedEx (NYSE: FDX) applied to the FAA in late 2019 for certification to modify the design of an Airbus A321 passenger plane to include the system. The FAA must issue a supplemental certification for any change to an approved aircraft design to ensure its airworthiness. 

The agency said “further internal study” of the proposed conditions, such as precautions against accidental discharge on the ground and in-flight safety for aircrews and other aircraft, is necessary. The decision to postpone the proposal and collection of feedback from interested parties was made to avoid public confusion, it said.

FedEx doesn’t operate the A321 and is in the business of hauling cargo, not passengers.

FedE has not explained the specific reasons behind its desire for deploying an antimissile system, but it is generally seen as way to protect against portable missiles of the kind that terrorists could use. FedEx appears to be testing the concept rather than seeking a broad fleet deployment.

Click here for more FreightWaves/American Shipper stories by Eric Kulisch.

WHAT ELSE TO READ:

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Eric Kulisch

Eric is the Supply Chain and Air Cargo Editor at FreightWaves. An award-winning business journalist with extensive experience covering the logistics sector, Eric spent nearly two years as the Washington, D.C., correspondent for Automotive News, where he focused on regulatory and policy issues surrounding autonomous vehicles, mobility, fuel economy and safety. He has won two regional Gold Medals from the American Society of Business Publication Editors for government coverage and news analysis, and was voted best for feature writing and commentary in the Trade/Newsletter category by the D.C. Chapter of the Society of Professional Journalists. As associate editor at American Shipper Magazine for more than a decade, he wrote about trade, freight transportation and supply chains. Eric is based in Portland, Oregon. He can be reached for comments and tips at ekulisch@freightwaves.com