• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Flooding could hit near key Northeast trucking markets (with forecast video)

Parts of the mid-Atlantic flooded by Tropical Storm Isaias on August 4 may re-live a similar situation today.

SONAR Critical Events and radar: Flash flood risk for Thursday, Aug. 6, 2020

Thunderstorms have already produced up to two inches of rainfall in portions of the Delmarva Peninsula this morning, prompting the National Weather Service (NWS) to issue a flash flood warning.

NWS forecasters are calling for several more rounds of showers and thunderstorms across the mid-Atlantic through tonight. This could lead to additional areas of localized flash flooding, along with potential closures of roads and highway ramps along the Interstate 81 and 95 corridors.

Two days ago, places like Allentown and Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, as well as Wilmington, Delaware, had daily record rainfall between 4 and 5 inches. Daily record rainfall was also set in Washington, D.C. at Ronald Reagan (ICAO code: DCA) and Dulles (ICAO code: IAD) airports.

Because more soaking rains will hit areas where the ground is still saturated from Isaias, this increases the odds of rivers, creeks and streams rising rapidly, leading to flash flooding. Storms could drop several more inches of rainfall today.

The NWS has issued a flash flood watch stretching from the Philadelphia metropolitan area to the Delmarva Peninsula; Washington, D.C.; Baltimore, Maryland; as well as Charlottesville and Harrisonburg, Virginia.

The key high-volume trucking markets of Harrisburg and Allentown, Pennsylvania, in addition to Elizabeth, New Jersey, are on the bubble as far as flash flooding potential. They lie just outside the watch area, and they rank third, sixth and seventh, respectively, in terms of how much outbound freight they have that is up for grabs. The FreightWaves SONAR Outbound Tender Volume Index (OTVI) measures this, and the leading markets are located in the upper left-hand portion of the chart below.

SONAR ticker: OTVI

Besides occasional torrential rainfall and reduced visibility, storms today may also produce dangerous wind gusts and large hail at times.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.
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