• ITVI.USA
    12,899.700
    27.330
    0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    16.060
    0.720
    4.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,881.580
    20.610
    0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.750
    0.100
    3.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.520
    0.160
    6.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.860
    0.020
    1.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.310
    0.140
    12%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.260
    0.100
    4.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.260
    0.040
    3.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.730
    0.150
    5.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    103.000
    -17.000
    -14.2%
  • ITVI.USA
    12,899.700
    27.330
    0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    16.060
    0.720
    4.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,881.580
    20.610
    0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.750
    0.100
    3.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.520
    0.160
    6.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    1.860
    0.020
    1.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.310
    0.140
    12%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.260
    0.100
    4.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.260
    0.040
    3.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.730
    0.150
    5.8%
  • WAIT.USA
    103.000
    -17.000
    -14.2%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Flooding, severe storms threatening Plains states Tuesday (with forecast video)

Severe thunderstorms slammed portions of the northern Great Plains Monday, with more than 30 reports of large hail and damaging winds in North and South Dakota, and one tornado in North Dakota.

SONAR Critical Events: Tuesday, June 30, 2020, 8 a.m. EDT; Severe thunderstorm threat

A wind gust of 84 mph was recorded at the North Dakota Department of Transportation’s Grassy Butte weather station. Winds of 80 mph were measured near New Town and Bears Lodge, North Dakota, with gusts of more than 60 mph in parts of South Dakota. Trees and power lines were blown in many locations.

A fairly slow-moving cold front moving across the nation’s heartland will spark more storms today and tonight, with severe winds and large hail at the top of the threat list. A tornado or two, as well as spots of potential flooding, are possible, and some storms could produce abundant cloud-to-ground lightning.

Most of the severe storms will hit from central and eastern portions of the Dakotas to northern and eastern Nebraska. This includes Bismarck, North Dakota; Pierre and Sioux Falls, South Dakota; and Norfolk, Nebraska. Drivers will likely run into delays on portions of Interstates 29, 90 and 94.

A few isolated severe storms could develop as far south as Omaha and Lincoln, Nebraska, as far east as Minneapolis, Minnesota and as far west as eastern Montana.

Isolated severe storms may also hit the middle Mississippi Valley in parts of Illinois, Missouri, Indiana and Kentucky, from St. Louis to Cape Girardeau, Evansville, Bowling Green and Lexington.

However, flooding will be a bigger threat in these areas compared to winds and hail. Periods of heavy rainfall could drench some of the same spots over and over (with brief rain-free periods in between the downpours). This process is called “training,” and often causes creeks, streams and some rivers to rise rapidly, particularly flooding low-lying and poor drainage areas.

SONAR Critical Events: Tuesday, June 30, 2020, 8 a.m. EDT; Flash flood watch areas shaded in orange

Rainfall rates will be intense at times, reducing visibility. Totals of 3 to 5 inches will be common across this region through Wednesday. The National Weather Service has issued flash flood watches, in effect through Wednesday morning for now.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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