• ITVI.USA
    15,569.490
    38.910
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.260
    -0.060
    -0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,521.990
    37.880
    0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.700
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.500
    -0.050
    -2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.080
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.080
    -5.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.950
    0.040
    1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.690
    -0.010
    -0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.130
    0.110
    3.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    120.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,569.490
    38.910
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.260
    -0.060
    -0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,521.990
    37.880
    0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.700
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.500
    -0.050
    -2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.080
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.080
    -5.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.950
    0.040
    1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.690
    -0.010
    -0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.130
    0.110
    3.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    120.000
    0.000
    0%
Driver issuesLegal issuesLess than TruckloadNewsTrucking

Holland sued over hiring ‘virtually no’ female truck drivers in Mississippi

A subsidiary of YRC Worldwide has hired “virtually no” females at a Mississippi facility, according to a federal lawsuit filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in that state earlier this week.

The lawsuit by the EEOC against LTL carrier and YRC subsidiary USF Holland came after earlier negotiations between the EEOC and the company failed to come to a resolution. The suit was filed in the U.S. District Court for the Northern District of Mississippi and focused on Holland’s terminal in Olive Branch, Mississippi, just across the state line with Tennessee and southeast of Memphis.

The failure of USF Holland to hire a female applicant named Marilyn Hervery kicked off the actions that led to the negotiations between the company and the EEOC. The suit alleges that USF Holland failed to hire Hervery and “a class of female applicants,” though no other female applicants are identified by name. 

Hervery, according to the lawsuit, had filed a charge with the EEOC alleging violations of Title VII, which prohibits discrimination on the basis of race and gender, among other characteristics. In August 2019, the EEOC sent USF Holland a letter saying there was “reasonable cause” to believe the company had violated Title VII “and inviting (Holland) to join with the commission in informal methods of conciliation to eliminate the unlawful employment practices and provide appropriate relief.” 

But those talks were not successful in reaching agreement between EEOC and Holland. The closure of those talks was marked by the EEOC issuing Holland a “notice of failure of conciliation” in September 2019.

Hervery’s claims are that she applied for a driver position with Holland in May 2014, at a time when the company had five open positions. According to the lawsuit, she met all the company’s requirements for the job. 

According to the lawsuit, Hervery was told during an interview that she needed forklift certification. She went out and got the required certification.

But she wasn’t hired. Three male applicants were hired, the lawsuit says, adding that two of them were interviewed after Hervery. 

“Hervery is at least as qualified or more qualified than the males hired by (Holland) into truck driving positions,” the suit says. 

And according to the lawsuit, the failure to hire Hervery was part of a long-standing practice at the Olive Branch facility. When the EEOC was investigating the company, Holland could not produce “any” records indicating it had employed any females as truck drivers since at least 2005.

It is possible that some females had driver jobs prior to that, as the suit says Holland has employed “virtually no females” since Olive Branch was opened in 1986. 

Its driver workforce in May 2016 was approximately 100 drivers. None were female, the lawsuit says. It describes Holland’s actions in reaching that position as “intentional.”

The lawsuit asks for a permanent injunction to stop Holland from “failing to hire” females. It also seeks back pay for Hervery and the unspecified class of female applicants and compensate them for both and future financial losses as a result of Holland’s practices.

A spokesman for Holland’s parent, YRC Worldwide, declined comment on the case.

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John Kingston

John has an almost 40-year career covering commodities, most of the time at S&P Global Platts. He created the Dated Brent benchmark, now the world’s most important crude oil marker. He was Director of Oil, Director of News, the editor in chief of Platts Oilgram News and the “talking head” for Platts on numerous media outlets, including CNBC, Fox Business and Canada’s BNN. He covered metals before joining Platts and then spent a year running Platts’ metals business as well. He was awarded the International Association of Energy Economics Award for Excellence in Written Journalism in 2015. In 2010, he won two Corporate Achievement Awards from McGraw-Hill, an extremely rare accomplishment, one for steering coverage of the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster and the other for the launch of a public affairs television show, Platts Energy Week.

5 Comments

  1. Do the company was interviewing for an open position. The female who didn’t have the certs was denied, and the interview applicants who had the required cert the company listed were hired after her.
    I don’t see what the problem is. She would have been hired if she met the pre requisites.
    This is why we don’t hire based off of gender and by qualifications. If she had the cert then she would have been hired.
    It’s her fault she didn’t get hired and it’s not discrimination. Women like her are the reason companies end up failing because it’s not about qualifications, but it’s about gender, and most females don’t want to drive trucks. It’s the same reason women don’t want to become welders or be a roughneck.

  2. DONT YOU KNOW THAT A TRUCK DRIVER IS ALLWAYS LOOKING FOR THAT GIRL HE CAN MARRIED …CAPABLE OF HANDLEING A RIG WITH EXPERIENCE…SO THEY CAN RUN TEAM ANF F…THROUGH THE HOLE ENTIRE UNITED STATES WHILE GETTING PAY ???

  3. Don’t these crossdock companies require you to lift upwards of 100#? As a woman in my 50’s I can’t do that. That’s called job requirement. If I want the job, I better hit the gym BEFORE I apply for an open position. These lawsuits are getting ridiculous.

  4. A little more info about the applicant would help understand her position a little better. Was she a driver just had a driving school? Is she a veteran with lots of experience? Everyone knows it’s hard to get one of those Union local jobs. Maybe that dumb ass lawyer should apply for the job himself to see if he gets it LOL

    1. Trucker 77 makes a good point. When I had to hire drivers I took into consideration a lot of things. Driving experience is just 1. She just got her forklift cert. That tells me NO experience on a forklift. Did she have a large number of previous employers? If so, why should I be wasting my time training someone that is going to quit?
      Did she say or do something offensive during the interview, what does she have on Social Media? If she had made degrading comments about race or some other hot button issue these are all things that would disqualify a person from employment.

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