• ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
  • ITVI.USA
    13,795.070
    81.410
    0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    26.560
    -0.120
    -0.4%
  • OTVI.USA
    13,740.380
    64.000
    0.5%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    -0.060
    -2.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.670
    0.130
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    0.280
    10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.320
    -0.020
    -1.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.040
    0.050
    1.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.740
    0.050
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.210
    0.000
    0%
  • WAIT.USA
    108.000
    5.000
    4.9%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Late season snowfall to clip key Northeast freight markets (with forecast video)

Mother Nature doesn’t always pay attention to the calendar, which she will prove this weekend. It’s early May, and heavy snowfall will hit parts of the Northeast by later today.

SONAR Critical Events and radar: Friday, May 8, 9 a.m. EDT

The low pressure system and associated cold front that will produce the snowfall will first produce heavy rainfall and strong thunderstorms across the lower Mississippi Valley and the Southeast today. Rain will begin to spread across the Northeast this afternoon. Later today, cold air will feed into the storm, changing the rain to snow. This process will continue tonight through Saturday, May 8.

Some forecast models are still showing snowfall totals of 6 inches or more for the high elevations in upstate portions of New York, Vermont, New Hampshire and Maine, with 3 to 6 inches possible in the western, central and northeastern mountains of Pennsylvania. Snow squalls are likely Saturday. Gusty winds and short bursts of snow will create brief periods of whiteout conditions across central New York state and northeastern Pennsylvania.

Areas closer to the coast, including major Northeast cities like Philadelphia, New York City, Boston, Hartford and Providence, will probably see 1 inch or less of wet snow, or just a snow-rain mix.

Fortunately, the accumulating snowfall will not be a major disruptor of the flow of freight from three key markets – Harrisburg and Allentown, Pennsylvania, as well as Elizabeth, New Jersey.  According to FreightWaves SONAR, these are top markets nationally in terms of outbound tender volumes (OTVI), ranking third, fifth and seventh, respectively. Combined, they account for 8.9% of the nation’s outbound volume, and are adjacent to each other in the Northeast region.

SONAR Ticker: OTMS Tree Map

The tree map above shows the outbound tender market share (OTMS) for all 135 markets.  Allentown, Harrisburg and Elizabeth are all in the left-hand portion of the map, which contains the highest values of any given index. 

Fortunately, freight movement delays due to weather should be low-impact and short-lived. Harrisburg, Allentown and Elizabeth should see only minor accumulations of wet snow, and the storm should fade Saturday night.

Have a great day! Please stay healthy and be careful out there!

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.
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