• ITVI.USA
    14,786.640
    2,951.100
    24.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    25.820
    -0.440
    -1.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,737.070
    2,949.900
    25%
  • TLT.USA
    2.740
    -0.070
    -2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.890
    0.260
    9.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    -0.150
    -4.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.280
    0.100
    8.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.000
    -0.210
    -6.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.750
    0.120
    7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.280
    -0.080
    -2.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    5.000
    4.1%
  • ITVI.USA
    14,786.640
    2,951.100
    24.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    25.820
    -0.440
    -1.7%
  • OTVI.USA
    14,737.070
    2,949.900
    25%
  • TLT.USA
    2.740
    -0.070
    -2.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.890
    0.260
    9.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.930
    -0.150
    -4.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.280
    0.100
    8.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.000
    -0.210
    -6.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.750
    0.120
    7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.280
    -0.080
    -2.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    5.000
    4.1%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Midwest truckers to face another early season snowstorm (with forecast video)

Highest impacts will be from northern Rockies to the northern Great Lakes

Record snowfall slammed several Midwestern cities Tuesday, delaying truckers on interstate highways. Some drivers were involved in accidents, and another storm is brewing Thursday.

Outlook

Places like Minneapolis-St. Paul and Duluth, Minnesota; Eau Claire, Wisconsin; as well as Fargo, North Dakota, received 4 to 8 inches of snowfall Tuesday. These were not only daily records but also October monthly snowfall records for some of these locations. 

Another 4 to 8 inches could pile up in the same areas through Thursday night and early Friday. Also, snowfall rates will be heavy at times, at 1 to 2 inches per hour.

The storm’s impacts will span from the northern Rockies of eastern Montana and Wyoming — where more than 12 inches of snowfall is likely — to the Dakotas, Minnesota, northern Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. This includes cities such as Billings and Glendive, Montana; Fargo and Bismarck, North Dakota; Pierre, Rapid City and Aberdeen, South Dakota; Fergus Falls and St. Cloud, Minnesota; and Marquette, Michigan, in addition to far northern Wisconsin. This will affect freight flows on Interstates 29, 35, 90 and 94.

Gusty winds will create periods of blowing snow and reduced visibility in some areas. Bridges and overpasses will be especially slick due to areas of freezing rain and slush. The storm should fade by sunrise Friday, but yet another snowstorm could hit the region over the weekend.

https://vimeo.com/470955669

Impact on freight

Freight markets in the potential impact zone include Missoula, Billings, Bismarck, Rapid City, Sioux Falls, St. Cloud and Duluth. These are mostly “backhaul” markets, meaning they have more inbound volumes than outbound.

This is evident in the FreightWaves Headhaul Index map below. This index measures the difference between outbound and inbound tender volumes. Markets in red/pink indicate higher inbound volumes (backhaul), while markets in blue/purple indicate higher outbound volumes.


SONAR ticker: HAUL map

So drivers heading to these markets in the snowstorm’s path are mostly dropping off. They will likely be deadheading — driving an empty trailer — to go where the freight is, in other Midwest markets or even Southern California.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.
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