• ITVI.USA
    15,839.740
    -5.440
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.799
    -0.007
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.070
    0.480
    2.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,836.590
    -10.170
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,839.740
    -5.440
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.799
    -0.007
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.070
    0.480
    2.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,836.590
    -10.170
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
BusinessDriver issuesGig WorkersModern ShipperNewsRailTop StoriesTruckingWarehouse

News alert: April jobs in trucking down by one measure, up in another

By either metric, gains in jobs are slow given the demand for drivers

Despite months of pay increases and the strongest freight market in recent memory, the number of jobs in the truck transportation sector fell in April according to one benchmark, though it rose by another measuring stick.

The monthly employment report issued by the Bureau of Labor Statistics on Friday showed that seasonally adjusted jobs in the truck transportation sector fell by 1,500 to 1,480,300 from a revised March figure of 1,481,800. The revision in that March number had taken it down from the previously reported 1,482,700.

There also was a revision in the February figure for seasonally adjusted jobs, which becomes the final number; the BLS numbers are subject to revision for two months after they are first released. February truck transportation jobs came in at 1,478,400 seasonally adjusted jobs, down from the most recent preliminary figure of 1,479,400. 

Although most economists look to the seasonally adjusted figures as most indicative, the not seasonally adjusted numbers did show growth in jobs in April. The BLS reported 1,465,100 jobs in that category, up from 1,461,000 in March. The final February figure was 1,453,500 jobs, showing a significant growth in not seasonally adjusted jobs for April of almost 12,000 positions.

Warehousing and storage jobs, which had been on a straight upward move, showed another decline. On a seasonally adjusted basis, they came in at 1,405,600, down 4,300 jobs from the 1,409,900 jobs of March. That March number in turn had been significantly cut from the earlier estimate of 1,414,300 jobs. 

On a not seasonally adjusted basis, warehouse jobs took an even bigger hit, declining to 1,397,100 jobs from 1,411,000 in March. The March number in turn was less than the “final” February figure of 1,416,300 jobs, suggesting that on a not seasonally adjusted basis, employment in warehousing and storage is down close to 20,000 jobs. However, on a seasonally adjusted basis, it is still well over last year’s April figure of 1,237,700 jobs. 

Courier and messenger jobs on a seasonally adjusted basis plummeted by 77,400 jobs to 1,009,000, down from 1,086,400 jobs. The drop on a not seasonally adjusted basis was even more severe, falling below the million jobs mark to 939,700 jobs from 1,036,400. 

Rail jobs continued their steady decline. On a seasonally adjusted basis, they were down to 142,300 jobs, a drop of 100. On a not seasonally adjusted basis, they were flat at 143,000 jobs.

FreightWaves will have continuing coverage of this story later Friday.

More articles by John Kingston

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Fragmented factoring business may soon shift toward larger players

Pandemic-fueled hedging innovation on diesel may be a keeper

John Kingston

John has an almost 40-year career covering commodities, most of the time at S&P Global Platts. He created the Dated Brent benchmark, now the world’s most important crude oil marker. He was Director of Oil, Director of News, the editor in chief of Platts Oilgram News and the “talking head” for Platts on numerous media outlets, including CNBC, Fox Business and Canada’s BNN. He covered metals before joining Platts and then spent a year running Platts’ metals business as well. He was awarded the International Association of Energy Economics Award for Excellence in Written Journalism in 2015. In 2010, he won two Corporate Achievement Awards from McGraw-Hill, an extremely rare accomplishment, one for steering coverage of the BP Deepwater Horizon disaster and the other for the launch of a public affairs television show, Platts Energy Week.

2 Comments

  1. ANYONE THAT CAN THINK, SHOULD KNOW THE REASON FOR UNEMPLOMENT, P;EOPLE WITH HELP WANTED SIGNS OUT WE CANNOT COMPETE
    AGAINST THE GOVERNMENT. UNEMPL.OYJMENT AND SIMULUS SHOULD STOP[ THEN PEOPLE WILL GO TO WORK BUT THE PROBLEM LAYUS IN
    THE GOVERNMENTS HAND TRYING TO BUY VOTES

  2. Many people can not afford child care and housing on jobs paying less than $18.00 cd or $15.23 U S per hour. The homeless shelters are full of people in Ontario Canada that have lower wage jobs. Many in shelters with children or in minivans in Ontario. The U S gov is giving enough money to cover the costs of support of a family. In Ontario Canada is very hard. Many employers want to hire people for 12.90 U S or $15.00 cd per hour for part time hours like Walmart. Many companies like Costco have people lined up to work for them at $19.00 cd or $14.70 U a per hour. Many trucking companies and private nursing are saying they can not afford to pay $26.00 cd or $21.00 U S plus medical and give these people 35 to 50 hours per week.

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