• ITVI.USA
    15,313.730
    14.490
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    25.570
    0.060
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,308.860
    14.530
    0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.690
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.900
    -0.030
    -1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.160
    -0.090
    -2.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.440
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.820
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.160
    -0.030
    -1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.400
    -0.020
    -0.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,313.730
    14.490
    0.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    25.570
    0.060
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,308.860
    14.530
    0.1%
  • TLT.USA
    2.690
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.900
    -0.030
    -1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.160
    -0.090
    -2.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.440
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.820
    -0.010
    -0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.160
    -0.030
    -1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.400
    -0.020
    -0.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Nor’easter continues to slam key freight markets

Delays likely along I-95 corridor through Tuesday

Heavy snowfall and strong winds will delay freight flows in the Northeast this week. The impact zone includes key freight markets in Pennsylvania and New Jersey.

Major cities and supply chain hubs within this densely populated zone include New York City; Philadelphia; Baltimore; Washington, D.C.; Hartford, Connecticut; and Boston. Potential road closures are possible on several major interstates, including I-95, I-84, I-81, I-80, I-76 and I-70.

The storm started Sunday and will impact tens of millions of people along with thousands of miles of key interstates. The effects of the storm’s timing — at the beginning of the week and the start of a new month — may reverberate across other parts of North America and the world, as far as logistics is concerned. This will be the strongest Northeast storm of the season.

Snowfall totals through Tuesday of 6 to 12 inches will be common, with some areas in the core of the storm receiving up to 20 inches. Wind gusts of 30 to 50 mph will produce blowing snow and occasional whiteout conditions. Gusts above 60 mph or higher could slam some places along and just off the coast, causing coastal flooding. Scattered power outages are also possible across the storm’s impact zone.

The winds alone will cause major port disruptions and potential port closures along the East Coast. Additionally, bridges could be shut down at times, especially for high-profile vehicles like tractor-trailers. Air cargo may also be delayed due to potential flight cancellations.

Key freight markets that will be difficult for truckers to enter include Harrisburg and Allentown, Pennsylvania, in addition to Elizabrth, New Jersey. They rank in the top 10 markets with the highest outbound volume tenders — the amount of loads offered by shippers to carriers.


SONAR ticker: OTMS tree map

According to the FreightWaves SONAR Outbound Tender Market Share (OTMS), those three markets account for 8.5% of the nation’s outbound volume. This is represented by the chart directly above in which the Harrisburg, Allentown and Elizabeth markets are circled. The bottom number is each location’s market share. These are areas where a lot of freight is available, but the storm could keep many drivers from getting there the next couple of days.

Heavy snowfall could return to the Northeast by Friday, after hitting the Cascades, Sierra Nevada and northern Rockies Tuesday and Wednesday as well as the Midwest Thursday.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.