• ITVI.USA
    17,113.070
    186.890
    1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    28.200
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    17,079.400
    184.170
    1.1%
  • TLT.USA
    3.090
    0.190
    6.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.630
    0.060
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.080
    -0.090
    -2.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.180
    -0.060
    -4.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.210
    -0.070
    -2.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.630
    -0.090
    -5.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.360
    0.070
    2.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    121.000
    1.000
    0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    17,113.070
    186.890
    1.1%
  • OTRI.USA
    28.200
    0.000
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    17,079.400
    184.170
    1.1%
  • TLT.USA
    3.090
    0.190
    6.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.630
    0.060
    2.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.080
    -0.090
    -2.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.180
    -0.060
    -4.8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.210
    -0.070
    -2.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    1.630
    -0.090
    -5.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.360
    0.070
    2.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    121.000
    1.000
    0.8%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Port restrictions set as Hurricane Delta approaches Gulf Coast (with forecast video)

Limits placed on vessel movement, but not ship-to-shore operations yet

Hurricane Delta is getting closer to the U.S., eyeing landfall in southwestern Louisiana in a matter of hours.

With Delta closing in, the U.S. Coast Guard set port condition Yankee at the Louisiana ports of Baton Rouge, New Orleans, Plaquemines, South Louisiana, St. Bernard and the Venice Port Complex. Under port condition Yankee, the ports may remain open, but vessel movement within them is limited. Traffic to and from the ports may also be restricted, but, until further notice, ship-to-shore operations continue. As the weather deteriorates, each captain of the port (COPT) may upgrade the port condition to Zulu, closing the port.

The Texas and Louisiana departments of transportation have not yet closed any sections of Interstate 10 in preparation for Hurricane Delta, but this could change as Delta nears landfall and water begins covering roads.

A hurricane warning remains in place from High Island, Texas, to Morgan City, Louisiana, a stretch of about 250 miles.

As of 8 a.m. Friday, Delta was a high-end Category 3 major hurricane with winds of 120 mph, spinning 160 miles south of Cameron, Louisiana. At its current rate of forward movement, Delta should make landfall late Friday afternoon or early evening just south of Lake Charles and Lafayette, Louisiana.

Tropical storm force winds extend up to 160 miles from the eye of the storm. So tropical storm conditions will begin along the Louisiana coast Friday morning. Hurricane conditions will begin in the warning area this afternoon.

Friday through Saturday, Delta is expected to produce 10 to 15 inches of rainfall in parts of the impact zone, along with 6 to 12 feet of “life-threatening storm surge,” according to the National Hurricane Center. This combination will lead to significant flash flooding, urban flooding and small stream flooding, along with minor to moderate river flooding.

Any truckers waiting to load last-minute freight in the impact zone need to get out as soon as possible. As the storm gets closer, high water, as well as downed trees and power lines due to severe winds, will lead to roadblocks.

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration has temporarily suspended hours-of-service (HOS) regulations for commercial truck drivers who will be directly assisting in Hurricane Delta recovery.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.
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