• ITVI.USA
    15,033.570
    -36.610
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.380
    0.040
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,017.490
    -33.390
    -0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.350
    0.280
    9.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.090
    0.230
    8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.730
    0.070
    4.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.100
    0.150
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.160
    0.120
    5.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.570
    0.220
    6.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,033.570
    -36.610
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.380
    0.040
    0.2%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,017.490
    -33.390
    -0.2%
  • TLT.USA
    2.720
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.350
    0.280
    9.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.090
    0.230
    8%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.730
    0.070
    4.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.100
    0.150
    5.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.160
    0.120
    5.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.570
    0.220
    6.6%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Southern severe weather threat for weekend truckers

Tornadoes, intense crosswinds, large hail, torrential rain possible

After half a dozen tornadoes hit Southern states over the past two days, the threat lingers for weekend truckers.

Tornadoes moved through Louisiana and Mississippi on Wednesday, followed by one in northeastern Tennessee on Thursday. Most of the twisters damaged homes and other structures, according to National Weather Service (NWS) reports. So far, no injuries or fatalities have been reported. NWS meteorologists will likely survey the damage in Tennessee on Friday.

The system triggering the storms will stall across the South, keeping chances for more tornadoes alive from eastern Texas to the Gulf Coast, Georgia, the Tennessee Valley and southern Missouri. This includes Tulsa, Oklahoma; Dallas-Fort Worth; all of Arkansas; most of Louisiana, Mississippi, Alabama and the Florida Panhandle; Memphis, Tennessee; as well as Atlanta and Macon, Georgia.

The risk will be higher Friday than Saturday, but that doesn’t mean drivers should let their guard down. Along with tornadoes, storms could produce severe crosswinds exceeding 60 mph in some areas, in addition to large hail.

Thunderstorm winds Wednesday toppled a driver’s trailer in northern Arkansas. Hail from golf ball to baseball size Thursday slammed parts of eastern Texas.

Rain will be torrential at times, quickly reducing visibility and possibly causing flash flooding. So, there’s always potential for ramp and road closures.

By Sunday, the tornado risk across the South will be slim to none. Any severe storms should be isolated, mainly from portions of Florida to the mid-Atlantic.

Other notable weekend weather

Drivers will hit snowy weather in the Washington Cascades from Friday afternoon through Saturday afternoon. The NWS has issued a winter weather advisory for places like Stevens Pass, Snoqualmie Pass and the city of Cle Elum. Total snowfall of 6 to 12 inches is likely, with gusty winds and blowing snow in some spots.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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