• ITVI.USA
    15,799.570
    42.680
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.420
    0.220
    0.9%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,800.870
    41.790
    0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.830
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.640
    0.250
    7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.680
    -0.160
    -5.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.450
    -0.060
    -4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.300
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.020
    0.040
    2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.030
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    7.000
    5.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,799.570
    42.680
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    24.420
    0.220
    0.9%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,800.870
    41.790
    0.3%
  • TLT.USA
    2.830
    0.010
    0.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.640
    0.250
    7.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.680
    -0.160
    -5.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.450
    -0.060
    -4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.300
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.020
    0.040
    2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.030
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    132.000
    7.000
    5.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Strong snowstorm keeps trucking through Northeast (with forecast video)

At least two airlines have suspended cargo, one railroad warning of freight delays

An impressive December pre-Christmas snowstorm keeps trucking through the Northeast as of Thursday morning. While carriers have been able to get shipments of COVID-19 vaccines to other parts of the country, the storm could delay shipments of the vaccine to large population centers along Interstate 95, from the mid-Atlantic to New England. Delays in general cargo are also likely.

During the day Thursday, the system will slowly move into the Atlantic, with the precipitation and strong winds gradually fading in the afternoon and evening. By Friday morning, the storm will be out to sea far enough for recovery and digging out to begin.

Across parts of the mid-Atlantic, upstate New York and much of New England, transportation will either be nonexistent or very slow. This includes the major cities and transportation hubs such as New York City, Boston, Philadelphia, Baltimore, Pittsburgh and Newark, New Jersey. Major interstates affected include I-95, I-80, I-81, I-90 and I-87.

Some places, like Binghamton, New York, have been slammed with 24 inches of snowfall or more since Wednesday. Several more inches will pile up Thursday in the main impact zone. 

Winds will remain very strong Thursday, diminishing Thursday night. Major blowing and drifting snow will continue, and whiteout conditions will hit many areas. Winds along the coasts of New York and much of New England will also remain very high.

Impact on freight

United (NYSE: UAL) and Delta (NYSE: DAL) airlines have announced restrictions on specialized cargoes at several major airports in the Northeast until further notice. Norfolk Southern (NYSE: NSC) railroad has told its customers to expect freight delays of 24 to 48 hours.


(Image: NOAA)

The New York Department of Transportation reported at least one tractor-trailer accident Thursday morning that led to a road closure. It happened on Interstate 81 north of Binghamton. Lanes have been closed on some state and U.S. routes in New York and other parts of the Northeast due to weather-related accidents.

As of Thursday morning, about 56,000 customers had no electricity across Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Virginia (the storm hit parts of the southern Appalachians Wednesday). Additional power outages will be possible.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin

Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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