• ITVI.USA
    15,462.460
    -34.260
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.752
    0.009
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.670
    -0.440
    -2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,437.200
    -29.190
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,462.460
    -34.260
    -0.2%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.752
    0.009
    0.3%
  • OTRI.USA
    20.670
    -0.440
    -2.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,437.200
    -29.190
    -0.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.300
    0.000
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.140
    0.190
    6.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.590
    0.150
    10.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.330
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.170
    0.020
    0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.080
    0.130
    3.3%
  • WAIT.USA
    125.000
    -1.000
    -0.8%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Wet weekend ahead for truckers in Eastern US

Localized flash flooding, road closures possible

Truckers will face a wet weekend from the Mississippi Valley to the East Coast.

Parts of southeastern Missouri and southern Illinois have already seen up to 5 inches of rain and flash flooding Friday morning due to a slow-moving cold front stretching from the Plains all the way to eastern Canada. This was based on radar estimates.

This front will gradually move southward over the weekend, dousing areas of the Mississippi, Ohio and Tennessee valleys, as well as the Northeast, with heavy rain. On any given day, the system could dump 4 inches or more of rain, leading to many more areas of potential localized flash flooding.

So far, the National Weather Service has issued a flash flood watch for southwestern Missouri, northwestern Arkansas, northeastern Oklahoma and southeastern Kansas. This includes Springfield and Joplin, Missouri; Fayetteville and Fort Smith, Arkansas; Tulsa, Oklahoma; and Wichita, Kansas. This watch is set to expire at 1 p.m. CT Friday but may be extended.

Another flash flood watch is in place for the Cleveland and Columbus, Ohio, metropolitan areas. This watch runs through Saturday morning but could be extended.

The NWS may issue additional flash flood watches later Friday and through the weekend as the system makes its progression southward. This would impact places like Cincinnati; Louisville, Kentucky; Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee; Philadelphia; New York City; and Boston.

Next week, the best chances for heavy rain and flash flooding will be in the Deep South and Gulf Coast states, including eastern Texas; Jackson, Mississippi; New Orleans; Mobile, Alabama; and the Florida Panhandle.

Two silver linings — flooding won’t likely be widespread across any given region, and most thunderstorms that pop up won’t be severe as far as winds, large hail or tornado threats.

Other notable weekend weather

Drivers will hit a heat wave in Big Sky Country from Saturday afternoon through the middle of next week. Highs will be climbing into the upper 90s and triple digits in eastern Montana, including the Great Falls, Glasgow and Billings areas, as well as areas in between. In some places, even overnight lows will remain very warm, in the 70s. The NWS has posted an excessive heat watch for the region.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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‘Painful mess’: I-40 bridge closure costing trucking industry $1M daily

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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