• ITVI.USA
    15,861.160
    -7.510
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.793
    0.019
    0.7%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.460
    -0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,867.600
    -6.080
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,861.160
    -7.510
    0%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.793
    0.019
    0.7%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.460
    -0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,867.600
    -6.080
    0%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
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  • WAIT.USA
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InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Winds could spread Western wildfires out of control again

Dry thunderstorms, lightning strikes also in forecast

Just as crews were gaining ground on some of the largest wildfires in the West, the weather will once again turn against them.

A low-pressure system is forecast to produce thunderstorms near many of these fires Thursday and Friday, as well as other areas that are also suffering from major drought. Unfortunately, these storms won’t drop much rain to suppress the fires. Instead, they will generate cloud-to-ground lightning strikes, along with wind gusts of 35 to 40 mph.

The lightning could spark new fires, while the winds could spread new and existing fires out of control. Not only will this be a challenge for firefighting crews, but truckers may hit many more areas of reduced visibility, unhealthy air and potential road closures.

Most of Nevada, in addition to northern and eastern California, are under a fire weather watch for these dry thunderstorms and gusty winds. This includes the Dixie and Caldor fire areas, the largest and second-largest wildfires in the country, respectively.

Dozens of other large wildfires are included in either the fire weather watch or red flag warnings that stretch from far northern California to Oregon, Idaho, Montana and Wyoming. Dry storms could also pop up in these areas, and winds will be gusty at times in the absence of thunderstorms.

Dixie fire

The Dixie fire in northern California has been burning since July 13. It was 922,507 acres in size as of Wednesday evening and 59% contained. It’s not only the largest wildfire in the country, but it’s also the largest single fire in California history. More than 4,800 firefighters and support personnel are working this fire.

Caldor fire

The Caldor fire in northern California has been burning since Aug. 14. It was 217,007 acres in size as of Wednesday evening and 50% contained, a big improvement from last week. The impending weather may set back the 4,820 firefighters and support personnel who are working this fire.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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