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Arthur Kill Lift Bridge nears completion of testing

Arthur Kill Lift Bridge nears completion of testing

The Arthur Kill Lift Bridge linking Staten Island and Elizabeth, N.J., is a few weeks away from becoming operational, reports the New York Economic Development Corp.

   Testing on the bridge began several weeks ago and will continue until it runs perfectly. The testing consists of lifting and lowering the bridge to see if the tracks realign correctly. The NYEDC said the bridge passes the test “pretty much all of the time,” but the Newark Star-Ledger reports that it has failed to align correctly several times.

   The NYEDC notes that the bridge is the longest of its kind in the area, and they would like to make sure the bridge is perfect working condition before they give the green light.

   The bridge is a reclamation project, originally built in 1959 and subsequently closed down in 1990. The restoration was announced in 2004 and the rehabilitation began in 2005. The project is costing the Port Authority of New York and New Jersey nearly $160 million.

   The goal of the project is to decrease traffic on the Goethals Bridge by taking tractor-trailers off the road and putting their freight on trains. In addition, garbage will be hauled by train as opposed to truck, saving the citizens and roads of Elizabeth from the odors and spillage that go hand in hand with 1,000 daily tons of New York City garbage.

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