• ITVI.USA
    15,621.050
    -98.140
    -0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.670
    0.130
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,626.480
    -100.680
    -0.6%
  • TLT.USA
    2.760
    0.020
    0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.800
    -0.060
    -1.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.040
    -0.060
    -2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.210
    -0.130
    -3.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.580
    -0.030
    -1.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.920
    -0.040
    -1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.450
    -0.070
    -2%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    2.000
    1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,621.050
    -98.140
    -0.6%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.670
    0.130
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,626.480
    -100.680
    -0.6%
  • TLT.USA
    2.760
    0.020
    0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.800
    -0.060
    -1.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.040
    -0.060
    -2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.210
    -0.130
    -3.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.580
    -0.030
    -1.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.920
    -0.040
    -1.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.450
    -0.070
    -2%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    2.000
    1.6%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

Flood threat keeps trucking across South

Additional periods of low visibility, potential flash flooding Wednesday

Periods of relentless torrential rainfall Wednesday will continue to drench parts of the Deep South and Gulf Coast. The region has been getting slammed most of the week so far, resulting in flash flooding.

New Orleans International Airport (ICAO code: MSY) received a daily record 4.1 inches of rain Monday. Daily records of 1.78 and 3.22 inches were set Tuesday in Pensacola, Florida, and Shreveport, Louisiana, respectively. Additional records could be set Wednesday.

A frontal boundary will remain stalled across the South for at least one more day. Waves of energy will travel along the front and, with plenty of moisture and energy in the atmosphere, they will produce showers and thunderstorms. The rain may be heavy enough at times to stop truckers in their tracks due to low visibility. There’s potential for additional flash flooding and road closures, and a few storms may also produce severe winds, large hail or an isolated tornado.

This won’t be a widespread flooding event that would virtually shut down freight flows and supply chains for days or weeks, but temporary delays are likely.

Flash flood watches from the National Weather Service (NWS) remain in place from Beaumont, Texas, to Pensacola. These are the areas most prone to flooding based on forecast precipitation totals and their proximity to sea level. Travel will be messy along the I-10 corridor, as well as sections of Interstates 55, 59 and 65. The watches are set to expire at various times Wednesday afternoon.

Some parts of the region, including the Florida Peninsula and southern Georgia, could see heavy rain Thursday. Two-day totals could exceed 3 inches again in some places. Most of the South should get a chance to dry out this weekend.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin, Director of Weather Analytics and Senior Meteorologist

In his nearly 20 years of weather forecasting experience, Nick worked on air at WBBJ-TV and WRCB-TV, including time spent doing weather analysis and field reporting. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from Georgia Institute of Technology. Nick is also a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” for eight consecutive years. Nick earned his National Weather Association Broadcasting Seal in 2005.

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