• ITVI.USA
    16,014.360
    14.660
    0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.799
    -0.006
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.430
    0.240
    1.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,995.600
    10.280
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.930
    -0.020
    -0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.620
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.330
    -0.040
    -2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.570
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.390
    0.070
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.130
    0.020
    0.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    16,014.360
    14.660
    0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.799
    -0.006
    -0.2%
  • OTRI.USA
    22.430
    0.240
    1.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,995.600
    10.280
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.930
    -0.020
    -0.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.620
    0.010
    0.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.330
    -0.040
    -2.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.570
    0.020
    0.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.390
    0.070
    3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.130
    0.020
    0.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    127.000
    0.000
    0%
American Shipper

INTERCARGO REPORTS LOSS OF 14 BULK SHIPS IN 2000

INTERCARGO REPORTS LOSS OF 14 BULK SHIPS IN 2000

   A total of 14 ships out of a total bulk carrier fleet of 5,513 were total losses last year, according to annual statistics just released by the International Association of Dry Cargo Shipowners.

   The London-based association reported that 23 seafarers’ lives were lost in 2000, the lowest figure during the 10-year period. Eighteen of those 23 lives were lost in one casualty, the Leader L, which sank following structural failure.

   The average age of bulkers lost at sea was 20.4 years, underlining the fact that older bulk carriers are statistically most at risk, the International Association of Dry Cargo Shipowners said.

   “Structural failure remains a consistent and significant cause of loss, while the presence of heavy cargoes feature in many of those losses,” it said.

   The association said that it supports the current work on bulk carrier safety at the International Maritime Organization and the emphasis being placed on formal safety assessment.

   The association commented that it is the right time to look at minimum shipbuilding standards.

   “As ships age, change in ownership and maintenance requirements increase, they may be operated in conditions that exceed the limitations of their design and construction,” the dry cargo shipowners association said.

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