• ITVI.USA
    15,868.670
    8.820
    0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.774
    0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.470
    0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,873.680
    8.980
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,868.670
    8.820
    0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.774
    0.001
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.470
    0.010
    0%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,873.680
    8.980
    0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.960
    -0.660
    -18.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.100
    -0.250
    -10.6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.610
    0.250
    18.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.340
    -0.130
    -3.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    3.860
    -0.220
    -5.4%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.520
    0.380
    12.1%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    -2.000
    -1.6%
American Shipper

“K” Line receives largest Japan-built containership

“K” Line receives largest Japan-built containership

“K” Line receives largest Japan-built containership

   “K” Line has taken delivery of the largest containership ever built in Japan, the “Humber Bridge,” which has a nominal capacity of 9,040 TEUs, although the Tokyo-based carrier has declared it with a loadable capacity of 8,212 TEUs.

   The vessel was built by IHI Marine United Inc. and is the first in a series of eight ordered by “K” Line for use in the Asia/North Europe trade.

   All eight ships will have an overall length of 336 meters (1,102 feet), a width of 45.8 meters (150.3 feet) and a service speed of 25.6 knots.

   The second vessel in the series will be delivered in November, with the third and fourth ships to be delivered in the first half of 2007. The remaining four ships will then be delivered from the second half of 2008 through 2009.

   The ships have a number of environmental and safety aspects in the hull design and onboard equipment, including:

   * A wider beam hull design to enables higher stability requiring less ballast water during sea voyage.

   * Electronically controlled engines to conserve fuel oil consumption by means of adjusting fuel injection and exhaust valves at suitable timing.

   * Fuel oil tanks located in the bulkheads (space between the holds) as well as double bottomed hulls to avoid fuel oil leakage if a collision occurs.

   * A heat recovery steam generator, which uses the heat from exhaust gas discharged from the main engine for generating electricity.

   * Carcinogen-free paint.

   * An electric motor driven windlass and mooring winch on deck that doesn’t require hydraulic oil.

   * All of the ships will carry an inventory list for Green Passport and takes advance measures in accordance with “Ship Recycle Guideline” adopted by the IMO in December 2005.

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