• DTS.USA
    5.788
    -0.013
    -0.2%
  • NTI.USA
    2.890
    0.010
    0.3%
  • NTID.USA
    2.940
    -0.010
    -0.3%
  • NTIDL.USA
    2.050
    0.000
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.100
    -0.010
    -0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,712.350
    20.670
    0.2%
  • DTS.USA
    5.788
    -0.013
    -0.2%
  • NTI.USA
    2.890
    0.010
    0.3%
  • NTID.USA
    2.940
    -0.010
    -0.3%
  • NTIDL.USA
    2.050
    0.000
    0%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.100
    -0.010
    -0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,712.350
    20.670
    0.2%
InsightsNewsWeather and Critical Events

News Alert: Truck carrying radioactive material crashes in North Carolina

Part of I-95 shut down for five hours

Part of Interstate 95 in Cumberland County, North Carolina, was closed for five hours Wednesday after a truck carrying a radioactive uranium compound crashed.

According to the North Carolina Department of Transportation, the crash happened around 11:30 a.m. ET near the junction of I-95 and Interstate 295, WAVY-TV reported. This is just northeast of Fayetteville.

Initially, I-95 was closed in both directions. The northbound lanes reopened at about 2 p.m., followed by the southbound lanes at about 4:30 p.m.

North Carolina State Highway Patrol officials on the scene said the crash involved a truck carrying uranium hexafluoride, which can be used to make fuel for nuclear power plants. The crash involved the commercial vehicle and a passenger van. This is according to a report from WTVD-TV. No one was hurt in the crash, and a HAZMAT team responded.

The same report said the Highway Patrol initially evacuated drivers from their vehicles and moved them away from the scene as a precaution. Drivers were later permitted to go back to their vehicles. Troopers said they didn’t see a rupture or compromise of the containers involved.

WTVD-TV also reported that, according to The Emergency Response Guidebook: A Guidebook for First Responders, radiation from uranium hexafluoride presents minimal risk to transport workers, emergency response personnel and the public during transportation accidents.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

Nick Austin

Nick is a meteorologist with 20 years of forecasting and broadcasting experience. He was nominated for a Midsouth Emmy for his coverage during a 2008 western Tennessee tornado outbreak. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from the Georgia Tech. Nick is a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in February 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” eight consecutive years.

One Comment

  1. Typical, but disappointing, that the TV piece and this article focus on the radioactive material and ignore the corrosive hazard, which is much more dangerous than the radiation.