• ITVI.USA
    12,849.680
    -131.320
    -1%
  • OTLT.USA
    3.013
    0.057
    1.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.950
    0.010
    0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,898.900
    -123.630
    -0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.060
    0.280
    10.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.580
    0.190
    7.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.920
    0.120
    6.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.290
    0.130
    6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.110
    0.120
    6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.950
    0.070
    2.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    129.000
    3.000
    2.4%
  • ITVI.USA
    12,849.680
    -131.320
    -1%
  • OTLT.USA
    3.013
    0.057
    1.9%
  • OTRI.USA
    8.950
    0.010
    0.1%
  • OTVI.USA
    12,898.900
    -123.630
    -0.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    3.060
    0.280
    10.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    2.580
    0.190
    7.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.920
    0.120
    6.7%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    2.290
    0.130
    6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.110
    0.120
    6%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    2.950
    0.070
    2.4%
  • WAIT.USA
    129.000
    3.000
    2.4%
InsightsNewsTop StoriesWeather and Critical Events

Potential nor’easter aiming for Northeast freight hubs

Storm could bring first significant snow of season by Friday

Just a few days after a snowstorm led to accidents that shut down a section of I-95 in Virginia for more than 24 hours, another storm will soon head toward the Northeast.

Areas from Washington to Boston could be in the thick of the storm, as well as other areas along and west of the Interstate 95 corridor.

The storm will develop across the Deep South, where cold air will be in place. Snow, sleet and freezing rain could hit parts of the mid-South, like Memphis and Nashville, Tennessee, by Thursday morning.

Then, from late Thursday afternoon through Friday morning, snow will spread from the mid-Atlantic to New England, exiting northern New England on Friday afternoon as it enters the Canadian Maritimes.


Related: Chaining up: 4 pro tips for truckers


Snow totals will range from 1 to 4 inches in the Washington, Baltimore, Philadelphia, New York City and Hartford, Connecticut, metropolitan areas. Providence and Boston could see up to 6 inches. This would be the first significant snowfall of the season for these cities and their inland communities.

Winds may be strong enough to produce periods of blowing snow and reduced visibility.

Which places see the most snow and just how much snow piles up depends on the exact path of the storm. If it tracks farther offshore than the latest outlook as of Wednesday morning, snow amounts could be higher and confined to the major cities mentioned. If it tracks farther inland, this would produce more rain along the I-95 corridor, with most of the snow staying inland.

(Map: FreightWaves SONAR Outbound Tender Volume Index (OTVI) map. To learn more about FreightWaves SONAR, click here.)

This storm will impact truckers heading to three key freight markets: Harrisburg and Allentown, Pennsylvania, as well as Elizabeth, New Jersey.

There’s a lot of freight available in these markets, and carriers like to send their drivers to where the freight is. The FreightWaves Outbound Tender Volume Index (OTVI) map above shows which markets have the highest levels of outbound loads being offered by shippers for carriers to pick up. The darker the blue, as in the three markets mentioned, the higher the OTVI value.

Major lanes of concern

• Interstate 95 from Fredericksburg, Virginia, to Augusta, Maine.
• Interstate 81 from Knoxville, Tennessee, to Harrisburg.

Click here for more FreightWaves articles by Nick Austin.

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Nick Austin

Nick is a meteorologist with 20 years of forecasting and broadcasting experience. He was nominated for a Midsouth Emmy for his coverage during a 2008 western Tennessee tornado outbreak. He received his Bachelor of Science in Meteorology from Florida State University, as well as a Bachelor of Science in Management from the Georgia Tech. Nick is a member of the American Meteorological Society and National Weather Association. As a member of the weather team at WBBJ-TV in Jackson, Tennessee, Nick was nominated for a Mid-South Emmy for live coverage of a major tornado outbreak in February 2008. As part of the weather team at WRCB-TV in Chattanooga, Tennessee, Nick shared the Chattanooga Times-Free Press Best of the Best award for “Best Weather Team” eight consecutive years.