• ITVI.USA
    15,845.180
    -15.980
    -0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.806
    0.013
    0.5%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.590
    0.130
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,846.760
    -20.840
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
  • ITVI.USA
    15,845.180
    -15.980
    -0.1%
  • OTLT.USA
    2.806
    0.013
    0.5%
  • OTRI.USA
    21.590
    0.130
    0.6%
  • OTVI.USA
    15,846.760
    -20.840
    -0.1%
  • TSTOPVRPM.ATLPHL
    2.950
    -0.570
    -16.2%
  • TSTOPVRPM.CHIATL
    3.610
    0.650
    22%
  • TSTOPVRPM.DALLAX
    1.370
    -0.240
    -14.9%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXDAL
    3.550
    0.210
    6.3%
  • TSTOPVRPM.PHLCHI
    2.320
    0.220
    10.5%
  • TSTOPVRPM.LAXSEA
    4.110
    0.250
    6.5%
  • WAIT.USA
    126.000
    0.000
    0%
FreightWaves LIVEFreightWaves LIVE: Events PodcastFreightWaves TVNews

SpaceWaves: Cleaning up the junk in lower orbit (with video)

Dooner and The Dude learn how keeping orbital space clean is a growing business

Dave Fischer talks keeping lower orbit clean and debris free.

What goes up must come down, or so they say; but what happens to the stuff that gets sent into space, orbits the Earth and never comes back?

Dave Fischer, vice president of business development and advanced systems for Astroscale, tells Dooner and The Dude how he is working to give space a clean sweep. 

“In the next 10 years you could see tens of thousands of new satellites,” says Fischer, with low-orbit space getting more and more crowded. 

Astroscale is focused on removing large debris from the orbital channel, basically getting rid of all the junk. 

It will remove things like old satellites, discarded stages of rockets and other large items that could cause collisions and damage to operational devices in orbit.

Fischer says there are two types of satellites: those prepared for eventual removal and those not prepared. 

Prepared satellites are built with docking stations or grappling hooks that make retrieval and removal easier, and Fischer hopes companies will start standardizing these features on anything they launch into space. 

Astroscale is also looking at performing fleet management on geostationary satellites that have finished out their intended life cycle but are still operational.

Kaylee Nix

Kaylee Nix is a meteorologist and reporter for FreightWaves. She joined the company in November of 2020 after spending two years as a broadcast meteorologist for a local television channel in Chattanooga, Tennessee. Kaylee graduated from the University of Oklahoma in 2018 and immediately made the Tennessee Valley her home. Kaylee creates written summaries of FreightWaves live podcasts and cultivates the social media for FreightWaves TV.

We are glad you’re enjoying the content

Sign up for a free FreightWaves account today for unlimited access to all of our latest content

By signing in for the first time, I give consent for FreightWaves to send me event updates and news. I can unsubscribe from these emails at any time. For more information please see our Privacy Policy.